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Patriot Rant

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Once upon a time the majority of Americans were pro-life, pro-gun, and pro-marriage defined as between a man and a woman. There was a time when most everyone would have recognized the politics of today’s Democrats as the antithesis of America. Have we have slipped so far left as a country that we are supposed to accept that moderate Progressivism is the new position for Republicans and Conservatism is just radical?? Hell No.

The only real change will be when we start calling Democrats for what they really are: moderate socialists or just plain communists, and start removing them from every position of authority and influence in the country. We will not survive as a nation of free people if their influence is permitted to continue in politics, media and the education system in America. There cannot be co-existence between these two very different political viewpoints. Liberty will disappear altogether once the Democrats have completed their mission and enough Americans reject their history and willingly surrender their sovereignty to the yoke of Government sovereignty.

History and Education

Last night once again I watched the movie “The Patriot” starring Mel Gibson. It’s one of my favorites. I’m not a movie critic so I will not debate the historical accuracies or inaccuracies of the film. The character Gibson plays Benjamin Martin is loosely based upon the lives of some very real Americans like Francis Marion known as the Swamp Fox who fought a guerrilla war against the British in South Carolina and is regarded as one of the heroes of the American Revolution.

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Say what you want about Mel Gibson the actor, he might have issues with alcohol and bigotry but the characters he plays in his movies are emotionally visceral, and stir the passions of most audiences. That’s something a good movie should do in my opinion. When I first watched this movie back in 2000, when it came out, it provoked an interest for me in a period of our country’s history I was not really familiar with, specifically the Revolutionary War and its battles in South Carolina.

The danger of course is that a movie’s portrayal of historical characters can and often does mislead the audience, into thinking they understand what really happened.  Oliver Stone’s movie JFK  comes to mind. I bet there were thousands of Americans after watching the movie, who were fully convinced once they left the theater that a conspiracy to kill Kennedy had existed and that Oswald had not acted alone. However, I would argue that a good movie like a good book opens doors to the minds of its audience stimulating interest in topics that would not otherwise never be explored. How many of you knew who William Wallace was before the movie Braveheart  came out? Maybe you still don’t really know after watching the movie but I’m sure there was more than one person who actually took the time to look up who the real William Wallace was and through their own research actually learned something about him. That interest in the topic would not have been there but for the movie.


Similarly I came across a television mini-series years back on BBC television set during Britain’s war with France in the early 19th century. Subsequently I wanted to learn more about the source of the movies and its central character Richard Sharpe and discovered the gems written by Bernard Cornwell  who is a master at writing historical fiction. Through this author’s work an entire period of world history came alive for me. I became interested in the Napoleonic period something that never would have happened had I not stumbled across the television mini-series.

History doesn’t have to be boring and should not be to those paying attention. Americans today need to understand their world history and their own history. As British author G.K. Chesteron  once said “The disadvantage of men not knowing the past is that they do not know the present. History is a hill or high point of vantage, from which alone men see the town in which they live or the age in which they are living. We are already seeing the price of ignorance today as more and more Americans are embracing a carefully fabricated image of government looking out for the little guy. They forget that not that long ago Americans rejected the fiction that a single enlightened ruler and his ministers could somehow govern their lives better than they could themselves.

In today’s world where businesses are demanding schools provide them more graduates with science and technology skills, the danger becomes focusing only on these areas and skimping on history. While having more skilled scientists and technicians may provide for more competitiveness and more profitable economies, reading just the Cliff Notes of history makes for altogether a too malleable citizen. A population must be able to think for itself if it is to remain free. Americans need to understand the sacrifices made by men like Marion and others who pledged their lives, their fortunes and sacred honor  in order to be free. This is something that should not be taken for granted or willingly surrendered for a false sense of security. Ignorance and apathy is being used against Americans today by those seeking to replace American exceptionalism and self-determination with a highly structured state controlled apparatus.


Schools provide one venue for education and news outlets another but there are dangers in getting information from only one or two sources. Americans need to read more preferably from the classics and original source documents. Many of these materials since the advent of the internet are only a click away.

Historical fiction can be a great gateway to getting started learning about past events and people and with that understanding ourselves.

“Not to know what has been transacted in former times is to be always a child. If no use is made of the labors of past ages, the world must remain always in the infancy of knowledge.” -Marcus T. Cicero c. 106-43 BC, Great Roman Orator, Politician

Common Core-another idea from the we know what’s best for you crowd

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Common Core is but one of many fronts in the ongoing battle of ideas for control of America.  Common Core or Common Core State Standards Initiative originated in 2009 was created by the National Governors Association and the Council of Chief State School Officers with input from teachers, researchers and “leading experts”. According to the Corestandards.org’s web site the standards are a “clear set of shared goals and expectations for the knowledge and skills students need in English language arts and mathematics at each grade level to ultimately be prepared to graduate college and career ready.”

The idea in principle sounds like a good one. Everyone can agree our schools and teachers should be accountable and are children need to be competent in core areas to be competitive in the world market place. Deciding how best to accomplish this task is the challenge.

On one side you have the old fashioned idea that parents and teachers should have a say in what the student’s education should look like based upon that student’s abilities and individual needs. On the other side you have this common held belief among most Progressives that it take a village to raise a child . Like Paul Reville, an education professor at Harvard and former Massachusetts secretary of Education said recently “the children belong to us all” or as MSNBC host Melissa Harris-Perry more ominously revealed “We have to break through our kind of private idea that kids belong to their parents or kids belong to their families and recognize that kids belong to whole communities.” Did you know that? Our children are not our own but belong to the community collective. Maybe I should have just sent my kid’s grocery tab to Uncle Sam. Who knew? It’s funny but I don’t recall my kids ever being assimilated by the Borg or the US Department of Education but perhaps that’s where Common Core is heading.

For the elites like Paul Reville one size does fit all. Just like Obamacare, the individual’s need to keep his healthcare is sidelined in favor of society’s overall need. Common Core is but one example of a fundamental and philosophical difference of opinion. Just who knows what’s best for you and your children? You, or some bureaucrat in Washington?

As Heritage Foundation fellow Lindsey M. Burke recently said “Children belong to their parents – their first educators and the people who have the most at stake in their educational well-being. Accountability is critically important in education, but accountability isn’t achieved by removing parents from the process out of a belief that bureaucrats will make better decisions.”  In addition there has been no meaningful empirical evidence to suggest national standards produce better outcomes. It remains to be seen if all of the states adopt Common Core or something similar. The federal government has offered a pretty big carrot with over 4 billion dollars in Race to the Top grant money for states willing to adopt the initiative. According to conservative political analyst Phylis Schlafy “the common core promoters, whose goal is a national curriculum for all U.S. children despite laws prohibiting the government from requiring it, used the clever device of copyrighting the standards by a non government organization, The National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and the Council of Chief State School Officers. This enables Common Core advocates to force uniform national standards while claiming that the laws prohibiting federal control of curriculum are not violated.”

The folly is failing to recognize that children like adults have different needs and wants, talents and abilities. We may be similar but we are not all the same and one standard does not fit all. Some Common Core’s critics have gone so far as to suggest that Common Core in its quest to standard tests and curricula also seeks to standardize minds, something that’s far from a traditional American value but very much in vogue with Progressives these days. Perhaps they seek to control the classroom as they do most newsrooms.

“Orthodoxy means not thinking–not needing to think. Orthodoxy is unconsciousness.” George Orwell, 1984

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